© 1999-2017 cedrick eymenier

Revelations
| Jeff Rian

catalog, Poses 01: cedrick eymenier, ordet editions, paris, 2010
french version below - version française plus bas

I’d been living in France since early ’95 when, in 1997, I landed my first teaching job — ever — at the École des Beaux-Arts in Nîmes. (My other occupation was in Paris, working with the magazine Purple Prose, as it was then called.) I’d been teaching about a year and had noticed Cédrick Eymenier in my art history class, but I hadn’t seen his work. Then one day toward the end of his second year, and mine, he asked me to take a look.
Second year students in Nîmes shared a spacious top-floor room of the main building. None of them had a studio per se. Cédrick, it seemed, didn’t need one. His work was portable. He showed me a few stacks of the snapshot-sized pictures he’d shot locally and on trips. His father, he told me, worked for the SNCF, so he took advantage of travel perks to expand his vista — he was also in the process of making short films, using video, which was a new venture for him.
Looking at his photographs I recognized the kind of uncommonness art professors come across so rarely in students. The thing that makes teaching art so compelling is that all the studying in the world can’t really help anyone predict what becomes art. One thing is sure: like basketball or chess, art requires a lot of practice (at least 10,000 hours of it according to evolutionary biologists) and a good feeling for the process — a process that says as much about our ever-evolving and constantly compelling psychology as it does about our ever-evolving and constantly compelling inventions.
Judging by the decks of pictures he’d set before me — conjured up in his wandering and traveling — it was clear that he’d managed to concentrate his looking into a coherent search and the material of pattern recognition: a medium, subject, and vision.
The photographs were all the same format, like snapshots. Normally that format alone irks me, because they’re just like the pictures we all get from commercial shops after vacation. But I try to be patient, so I look for some element of personality or originality, which has to be there if someone expects to show such things as art. Cédrick’s originality was evident in the subject, the light, and his understanding of the process, which, as he made clear to me, the commercial format was simply archival; he was still working out how he wanted to show them. Ergo, he expected something more from the process and from his pictures. (For his third-year DNAP diploma, he projected a fairly impressive number of slides in a large room. Over the slide projector he hung a microphone, which was connected to a digital delay pedal and a guitar amp, so that each image ricocheted into view with a slightly pumped-up sound something like the audio effects that shake up our senses at the movies, which Cédrick mimicked more subtly. And of course the images were strong.)
His pictures have always been shot around places where people live: tree-lined streets with houses, buildings, shops, cars, sometimes a shaded vacation bungalow, etc. There aren’t any historical monuments or urban icons. Nor are there people, or at least very few. And like the color photographs of William Eggleston, a master of the mundane vista, Cédrick found a way to enhance, aesthetically, the places we either ignore or find artistically uninspiring. Specifically, though, he looks for radiant, reflected light.
Each picture I saw that day was carefully shot to enhance specific elements. Not one of them faded at the edges as a lot of snapshots do, because the picture taker doesn’t know enough about the process: the relationship between film stock, aperture, and speed. (Most photographs I see are badly framed, badly lit, or out of focus.) His pictures are always sharp as a freshly washed window on a crisp clear day. And they have a style that might be described as a personal reordering of urban light. This “reordering” is something he finds in the spatial relationship between flashes of color, ambient light, and the real-world forms that are bathed in that light. He doesn’t exaggerate the relationships between the highlighted details and the background forms; he simply reveals them. But to depict such things, they first have to be discovered.

+++

Over 500 years ago Renaissance artists started the process of making accurate, window-like images of the visible world. Paintings were constructed using the new invention of one-point, linear perspective, which created the palpably realistic images that would define the Western Canon. But only three centuries later one-eyed perspective was co-opted by the mechanical technology of photography, and made commercially available, thus influencing everyone’s idea of pictorial representation. Generations on, Cédrick’s piles of pictures revealed a way of focusing an image, as opposed to making one, say, with paint.
Styles are repeated and repeatable, and require practice. Redundancy, repetition, and pattern recognition are the requirements of all forms of communication, as well as of the creation and recognition of styles. As noted earlier, I work for Purple magazine; and naturally the artists I see who take pictures want them to be published, and I was always open to prospective candidates. But the pictures have to be good as well as appropriate for the magazine. To be honest, Cédrick was the only student I found whose sensibility fit in with ours. Which is to say that his accumulated body of photographs related aesthetically to the way Purple was trying to communicate something about photography its pages.
My background in writing about photography began with an interview I did with Richard Prince, published in Art in America in March 1987 — an artist who took pictures but was not a trained photographer. A year later I wrote a monograph that accompanied the first really big overview of his work at the Magasin, in Grenoble.
Prince is now associated with what is now called the “pictures generation”. That name came from a 1977 exhibition called “Pictures”, held at Artists Space, a nonprofit organization in Lower Manhattan, organized by its director, Helene Weiner, and Douglas Crimp, a young art historian and theoretician. In his essay Crimp wrote about artists who had incorporated mass media reproductions into their artworks and whose world was essentially dominated by such images. There were five artists in the Artists Space show: Sherrie Levine, Robert Longo, Phillip Smith, Troy Brauntauch, and Jack Goldstein. Neither Richard Prince nor Cindy Sherman, who are now seen as the king and queen of the pictures generation, were in the Artists Space exhibition. (Nor were they known in the art community in 1977.) But those two artists, among many others, would raise photography to the status of painting, many of them making photographs as big, colorful, and dramatic as paintings.
Pictures generation artists were, of course, well acquainted with the modern, formalist processes of painting, drawing, and sculpting. They were also wholly immersed in the prolific world of commercial and celebrity-based imagery, as everyone now is — and which many critics have come to associate, a bit too facilely I think, with spectacle. Pictures artists incorporated photographic images of every variety into the traditionally styled art objects they made in their big, then-still-cheap loft studios in Lower Manhattan. They found inspiration in artists like Rauschenberg, Johns, and Warhol, who’d abandoned the angst-driven self-expression of abstract expressionist painters like Pollock and Newman, but who took to heart those Ab-Ex artists’ large scaled paintings, which echoed Picasso’s Guernica, but not the grand vistas of Cinemascope to which some pictures artists compared their images.
Sherman shot herself as a movie actress in her own make-believe film stills. Prince “re-photographed,” as he called it, magazine and billboard advertisements, many of them in black-and-white, cropping the textual blurbs and part of the image to highlight selected elements, such as hands holding cigarettes, women looking to their left, or cowboys. Prince used Kodachrome slide film (which can still be purchased by mail) to create a style of picture that looked old and new all at the same time, such as his rose-tinted, slide-based rephotographs of black-and-white images of wrists showing off wristwatches.
I’m a baby boomer like Prince, one of the hoarding millions born between 1946 and ’64. Our generation grew up on modernism and hand-made art. Magazine images were a common source for pictures generation artists. Then, in 1992, the new, user-friendly Macintosh computer, freshly on the market, empowered people like Elein Fleiss and Olivier Zahm, the founders of Purple Prose, to raise the bar on home-made representation and to create artistic magazines using a Mac. This generation of amateur magazine-makers, who were about ten years older than Cédrick, needed photographers to fill their pages. Purple (its name was simplified to that in 1998) worked with Wolfgang Tillmans, Terry Richardson, Anders Edström, and Mark Borthwick, to name a few. These photographers depicted their generation and its life styles, the X generation as it’s been called, and which I associate with Purple’s style. Their photographs weren’t heavily processed, as were Sherman’s, Prince’s, and the painting-scaled photographs of Europeans photographers like Andres Gursky, Thomas Ruff, and Thomas Struth. Xers belonged to a different world and favored a different sensibility. They listened to indie rock, like Sonic Youth, Chan Marshall of Catpower, and Will Oldham, or Palace Brothers in his first manifestation — not Talking Heads or The Cars. They made installation art and didn’t necessarily live and work in lofts where they made objects for galleries. They were inspired by independent movies, especially those coming from Japan and Taiwan — not Apocalypse Now or Blade Runner. Photographers like Tillmans, Edström, and Borthwick conveyed a look that was aesthetically and pictorially like those independent films. They made pictures for magazines. The indie look that appeared in Purple would evolve a global style of fashion photography (which is another story).
In 1992 Cédrick was a teenager growing up in the South of France. Six years later it was the photographers who shot for Purple Prose, such as Anders Edström and Mark Borthwick that I matched up in my mind with Cédrick’s pictures, watching him shuffle through his stacks with the insouciant confidence and critical eye of an artist. I wanted to tell him about Anders, but Cédrick said he’d already seen his pictures in Purple. (His knowledge of contemporary art and photography was persuasive.)
Anders Edström, in my opinion, is a contemporary master at capturing light in its radiant purity. His photographs of naturally lit subjects exhibited one of the striking differences between pictures generation artists and the photographers of the computer age. Cédrick’s pictures revealed a related perspective to Anders’ quiet scenes and their strong emphasis on ambient light. Cédrick lines up an image along the gradients of ambient light, which must be coordinated with film speed and aperture. That lining up embodied the coherence I saw in his pictures.
It’s difficult to say how one learns such things, as they are the accidents of personal evolution. This was 1998. Cédrick used a Nikon. Digital photography was in its formative stage. Computers were changing the world. Still, an artist needs a subject.

+++

Eugène Atget (1857–1927) chose one great big subject, thinking that one day an encyclopedic accumulation of images would convey a sense of time, place, and history — which his did about the city of Paris. Photographers like Weegee (née Arthur Fellig; 1899–1968) and Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908–2004) captured startling events; the former took pictures of violent deaths and the latter of current events. In their time photographs were black-and-white.
Color photography evolved from black-and-white, pushed along by technical developments and a critical discourse about composition, from George Eastman (founder of Eastman Kodak), Walker Evans, William Eggleston, to Photoshop-enhanced images like Gursky’s large-scale, highly detailed photographs, which he produces with a very large format camera and which can be seen as gestalt images from several meters away or read like texts from up close. The human eye cannot take in all that information at once. Our eyes are not like a camera obscura, a dark room. We have to focus our eyes to see details.
Many contemporary photographers have also made classically styled black-and-white pictures. In the late ’60s and early ’70s, Lewis Baltz photographed industrial parks, which he developed in his kitchen using paper with a lot of silver content. In the 1980s James Casebere built architectural models out of polystyrene boards, which he shot in color but dramatically lit to look like a dramatic black-and-white photograph by Ansel Adams. Robert Mapplethorpe photographed hard-bodied male nudes, which recalled classical marble sculpture. Each of these photographers recalled a formalist design and composition.
Cindy Sherman’s early film stills were also shot in black-and-white, as were many of Richard Prince’s “rephotographs.” But their works recalled commercial reproductions, not standard-scaled formalist photography, shot from life. There are of course color photographers who create stoically classical images, such as Paul Outerbridge’s nudes, which he often exposed on matte paper, or Irving Penn’s monumentally elegant pack shots. And following in a similar style as Casebere (or Gregory Crewdson’s mise-en-scènes), contemporary artist Thomas Demand constructs models of interiors, which he photographs to appear as highly graphical images. These are all a style of showpiece photography, reaching toward the grandness of paintings.
By the time Cédrick was involved in what came to be called the Purple Institute, magazines, videos, and imaginable photograph were being catalogued in search engines like Google. Images of every stripe were canned in portable electronic devices. Unlike my generation or even that of the founders of Purple, Cédrick’s generation doesn’t so much buy magazines or go to the movies as download whole universes of information. Clearly this evolution in mass information and perhaps his connection with Purple magazine’s independent outlook have influenced him. But so has the history painting, although not so much for the subject or composition as for the effects of color and surface.

+++

Paintings are heavily controlled, hand-made pictorial representations. They require compositional stability. I tell young painters to be wary of any dominating diagonals, because they lead eyes off the picture plane and crack an image’s frontal equilibrium. I compare Piet Mondrian, who centered his images squarely, sticking with primary colors and black, to Mondrian’s friend Theo van Doesburg, who introduced the diagonal and the color green, which took his abstractions away from culture’s squares and grids and into the engulfing miasma of nature. (I’m over-simplifying here. The German painter, Tomma Abts, winner of the 2006 Turner Prize, defies all of my tenets. Yet I admire her way of using diagonals and of letting old tape marks remain visible, which is a clue to art’s fascinating unpredictability.) Nevertheless, images require the stabilizing forces of balance, order, and proportion. A stabile image embodies its confines. Such things make and break artists. Some artists instinctively create unquestionable images. As a second year student Cédrick could, too.
Recently, though, while talking with Cédrick, I was reminded of an article E. H. Gombrich published in 1964 called “Light, Form, and Texture in Fifteenth Century Painting”, in which he made a distinction between how light falling on bodies “reveals its form” and how “the way the body’s surface reflects the light reveals its texture”. Gombrich juxtaposed Jan Van Eyck’s Madonna with the Canon van der Paele, 1436, which he described as highly detailed and luster-oriented because of the light reflecting like mirrors in its details, with Domenico Veneziano’s The Virgin and Child with Saints, painted in Florence circa 1441, which used a drier palette of colors and was a more formal study in the three-dimensional modeling of forms and shapes in accurate perspective. Northern European artists like Van Eyck created surfaces of reflections in which texture and luster emphasized details like the “sheen of the Madonna’s hair”. South of the Alps painting was more sculptural and fell in line with Leone Battista Alberti’s stressing the careful construction of stabile form in perspective over the careful rendering of surface reflection, as documented in his Treatise on Painting, published in 1435. For example, Alberti insisted, artists should not use gold, as had been common in earlier Italian art, because using gold’s reflective dazzle cheapens the effect and fails to embody the form.
Gombrich’s art-historical comparison is a compelling generality. Van Eyck and Veneziano constructed images based on their own conventions of religious subjects and pictorial representation. Above the Alps artists developed conventions of reflection. Below the Alps, following Alberti (an exemplar of the new humanism), artists depicted images following the technical rules of linear perspective. Eventually one group learned from the other as they traveled and interacted.
Artists have always practiced their crafts in concert with current conventions. They also look for ways to personalize such conventions. Linear perspective is the focal development of Western art. We’re beyond such specificity today, however. Cinema and television has even influenced a reversal, in which seated viewers are the focal points of illuminated images. But if one were to impose Gombrich’s thesis of form versus reflection on photography, then black-and-white pictures could be interpreted as being formal: a subject is made visible in the gray-scale contrasts between absolute black and white, which tends to reveal form. An extreme example is the Russian constructivist photographer, Alexander Rodchenko. But the black-and-white photographs by Baltz, Casabere, and Mapplethorpe were also graphically silent, stabile as stone, without the least suggestion of movement, which is one of the foibles of luster and sheen. Light doesn’t stay still; and color photographs, especially those engaging light’s reflections, are subject to the contingencies of movement and transition in the light, but not the form.
Cédrick’s color photographs are surfaces of light, luster, and form, but not simple contrasts in shapes and forms. His pictures are like apparitions that have come into being from his gazing at the luminous world. Subject matter is coincidental with the light. Apparitions disappear with the slightest change of perspective. Cédrick’s photographs could be thought of as closer in type to the luster and reflections of a Van Eyck painting. And yet his formalism bears closer kinship to Rodchenko, but without the Russian constructivist’s dogmatic sculptural geometry. Cédrick doesn’t startle you with his style or composition the way Rodchenko does. His images are more lustrous than sculptural. He looks for uncommon relationships between objects, colors, surfaces and reflections, which he narrows into a stabile overall image, say the way a painter might organize contrasting colors into a visual pattern, but engaging the light reflecting off a car’s surface.
Which brings up an important aspect of modern art: noticing. By that I mean noticing the world through a critical eye (which in our world is turning into the social analysis of an evolutionary psychologist). Cédrick will notice when two very different objects on a city street are the same color. He’ll line them up in his camera’s viewfinder in order to highlight the propinquity of the unrelated objects, fixing similarly reflected light in his focus. This perspective is something like the incidental design one finds twirling the tube of a kaleidoscope, looking for patterns that line up coherently. Except that the focus of his noticing derives from looking for patterns of light and color. Which is what I meant by saying his photographs were painterly in their organization of color and reflection.

+++

The photographs I saw in Nîmes, circa 1998, were middle-distance pictures, shot in the busy interstitial areas between urban centers and the suburbs, between the centrally located monuments of high civilization’s cathedrals, museums, and skyscrapers and the countryside toward which civilization spreads outward to engulf it. In such zones he engages with the light, the true medium of photography.
Cédrick’s accumulated bodies of work have evolved over the years into different but related perspectives, so that a still-life of a rock crystal will echo in its solidity the reflected light of car bodies or flowers seen along a street in other pictures. Capturing a strong image requires technical precision. That’s something one has to conjure from within, through practice. In my experience, by the second year of art school that kind of thing should start to become apparent and begin to evolve. As a result, from that first meeting I didn’t speak to him as a professor but as a fellow traveler. And since that time his work has evolved incrementally. His travels have enhanced his discoveries of different shades and degrees of light — the illuminator of matter. His eye has been honed to reveal light’s varied but predictable relationship to objects. The results are often splotches or splashes of color emanating from shop windows, car windshields, drinking glasses, billboard advertisements, flowers, etc. Colors emerge from a background into the light, heliotropically, held in place in a camera’s viewfinder. Blurring one’s eyes might give them the abstract aura of a painting, say, by Odilon Redon, whose moody paintings contrasted bright pastels emerging from somber ones. But there’s no need to blur the eyes here — in order to access an obscure psychological enigma. The photographs say what they have to say with the utmost clarity.

+++

Gombrich wrote about how reflective luster and formal modeling were made visible in Renaissance painting. Centuries later, when photographers began to use color film, many thought the images were vulgar. Only black-and-white photographs, particularly silver-gelatin prints, had the stateliness of a classical image. Color was surface dazzle, recalling the glitter of mosaics not the timelessness of stone — something like Alberti’s complaint about painters using gold leaf. Cédrick uses light to highlight and enhance the middle distance between high culture and raw nature — the places we thrive.
All of us are startled by the contrasts of light at sunset and sunrise, by campfires, spotlights, and by towns lit up at night. Such visions sensually highlight, often sensationally, the bridge between darkness and light. Cédrick makes light more noticeable.
Two things I haven’t mentioned: Cédrick makes movies and plays music. His films add movement to his photographic vision, which is not easy, considering that his photographs require him to find special moments of light. Adding duration to photographic recognitions requires a good setting, the right light, and the organizational ability of a motion-picture camera operator. He’s made films in Chicago, Tokyo, Rotterdam, Miami, at the Charles de Gaulle-Roissy airport and at La Defense, outside of Paris, and films about the rain and driving, to name two themes. The films exhibit the same selective curiosity as his photographs. His films are also accompanied by music, either made by composers like Stephan Mathieu, Fennesz, or the American couple Damon & Naomi, or by himself or his band, Cats Hats Gowns. His instrumental music, which is based on guitar and Moog synthesizer sounds, searches a related sensibility as his photographs: combining a background mood with a foreground revelation; improvising melodies over grooves. His music has emerged from the kind of music I listened to working at the Purple Institute — and is something we have in common. One of Cédrick’s favorite guitarists is Loren Connors, a specialist in simple but elegant sounds. And Cédrick’s sensibility, like mine, resists the naked vulgarity of the many genres that proliferate in popular music and art, such as the thrumming, nerve-wracking soundtracks of movie theaters, as well as the blatant egotism of the maniacally ambitious.
For about four thousand years art was made for temples and palaces, later called museums and galleries — places people make a concerted effort to visit, either for worship or cultural edification. People now watch films at home and download their music into portable devices. This transition takes viewers out of the architecture of an older world and into the gravity-free cosmos of the space age and the computer — a medium that not only transcends space but also funnels information into itself. We are also in the throes of a renaissance of photography books, which are the personalized offspring of temples and palaces. The images in this book are the iconic revelations of his wandering.

---------

Révélations
| Jeff Rian

Je vivais en France depuis 1995 quand, en 1997, j’ai décroché mon tout premier poste d’enseignant à l’Ecole des Beaux-Arts de Nîmes. (Mon autre emploi était à Paris, où je travaillais pour le magazine qui, à l’époque, s’appelait Purple Prose). Cela faisait environ un an que j’enseignais, et j’avais remarqué Cédrick Eymenier à mon cours d’histoire de l’art mais je n’avais jamais vu son travail. C’est alors qu’un jour, vers la fin de sa deuxième année, et de la mienne, il me demanda d’y jeter un œil.
À Nîmes, les étudiants de deuxième année partageaient une salle spacieuse au dernier étage du bâtiment principal. Aucun d’eux n’avait d’atelier personnel. Cédrick, semblait-il, n’en avait pas besoin. Son travail pouvait se transporter. Il me montra quelques piles de photos format instantané prises dans la région ou lors de voyages. Son père, me dit-il, travaillait à la SNCF, il profitait donc des voyages gratuits pour élargir sa vision. Il s’essayait aussi à la vidéo, ce qui était nouveau pour lui.
En regardant ses photos, je reconnus cette originalité que les professeurs d’art rencontrent si rarement chez leurs étudiants. Ce qui rend l’enseignement de l’art si fascinant, c’est que toutes les études du monde ne peuvent vous aider à prévoir ce qui deviendra de l’art. Une chose est sûre : comme le basket ou les échecs, l’art nécessite beaucoup de pratique (au moins 10 000 heures selon les biologistes de l’évolution) et une bonne intuition de sa mise en œuvre : une mise en œuvre qui en dit autant sur notre psychologie toujours fascinante, en perpétuelle évolution que sur nos inventions elles aussi toujours fascinantes en perpétuelle évolution.
À en juger par l’éventail d’images que j’avais devant moi — surgies de ses errances et voyages —, il était clair qu’il était parvenu à focaliser son regard sur une recherche cohérente et à réunir le matériau nécessaire au processus de création : un médium, un sujet, une vision.
Les photographies avaient toutes le même format, comme des instantanés. D’habitude, ce format suffit à m’irriter :c’est ce que nous récupérons tous chez le photographe au retour des vacances. Mais j’essaie d’être patient, et je cherche toute manifestation d’une singularité ou d’une originalité, ce qui est nécessaire si on a l’intention de présenter de telles choses comme de l’art. L’originalité de Cédrick était évidente dans le sujet, la lumière et sa maîtrise du traitement, et ce format commercial n’était, comme il me l’expliqua, qu’un moyen d’archivage. Il réfléchissait encore à la façon dont il voulait les montrer. Et il espérait améliorer le traitement technique de ses images. (Pour son Diplôme National d’Arts Plastiques, en troisième année, il projeta un nombre assez impressionnant de diapositives dans une grande salle. Au-dessus du projecteur, il suspendit un microphone relié à une pédale delay et à un ampli de guitare, de sorte que chaque image surgissait à la vue avec un son légèrement amplifié, quelque chose comme ces effets sonores qui ébranlent nos sens au cinéma, que Cédrick imita, en plus subtil. Et bien sûr les images étaient fortes.)
Ses photos sont toujours prises autour d’endroits où vivent des gens : des rues bordées d’arbres, avec des maisons, des bâtiments, des magasins, des voitures, parfois une bungalow ombragé, etc. Il n’y a pas de monuments historiques ou d’icônes urbaines. Il n’y a pas de gens non plus ou alors juste quelques-uns. Et comme dans les photographies en couleurs de William Eggleston, un maître de la photographie vernaculaire, Cédrick a trouvé une façon de mettre en valeur, esthétiquement, des endroits que nous ne regardons pas ou que nous trouvons sans intérêt artistique. Il recherche néanmoins, expressément, une lumière qui irradie et qui se reflète.
Toutes les photos que j’ai vues ce jour-là avaient été soigneusement prises pour mettre en valeur des éléments précis. Aucune d’elles ne s’estompait sur les bords comme c’est le cas sur beaucoup d’instantanés amateurs parce que le photographe manque de maîtrise technique quant au rapport entre le type de pellicule, l’ouverture du diaphragme et la vitesse d’obturation — la plupart des photos que je vois sont mal cadrées, mal éclairées, ou floues quant les siennes sont toujours aussi nettes qu’une vitre fraîchement lavée lors d’une claire et belle journée. Et elles ont un style qu’on pourrait décrire comme un réarrangement personnel de la lumière urbaine. Ce « réarrangement », il le tire de la relation spatiale entre les éclats de couleur, la lumière ambiante, et les objets de la vie quotidienne qui baignent cette lumière. Il n’exagère pas les relations entre les détails mis en lumière et les formes de l’arrière-plan ; il les dévoile simplement. Mais pour représenter de telles choses, il faut d’abord les découvrir.

+++

Il y a plus de cinq cents ans, les artistes de la Renaissance commencèrent à produire des images fidèles du monde visible, comme à travers une fenêtre. Les peintures étaient composées en utilisant l’invention récente de la perspective linéaire à un seul point de fuite, qui donna naissance aux images manifestement réalistes qui allaient définir le Canon Occidental. Mais à peine trois siècles plus tard la technologie mécanique de la photographie s’appropria la perspective à un seul point de fuite et la rendit disponible dans le commerce, influençant ainsi l’idée que chacun se fait de la représentation picturale. Des générations plus tard, les piles de photos de Cédrick révélaient une façon de mettre au point une image, par opposition au fait d’en fabriquer une, disons, en peinture.
Les styles sont répétés et reproductibles, et nécessitent de la pratique. La redondance, la répétition et l’identification des motifs et des formes sont les pré-requis à toute forme de communication, ainsi qu’à la création et à la reconnaissance des styles. Comme je l’ai dit plus haut, je travaille pour le magazine Purple ; et bien sûr, les artistes que je vois qui prennent des photos veulent qu’elles soient publiées : je suis toujours ouvert à de nouveaux candidats mais il faut que les photos soient bonnes et dans l’esprit du magazine. Pour être honnête, Cédrick est le seul étudiant que j’aie rencontré dont la sensibilité correspondait à la nôtre. C’est-à-dire que l’ensemble de ses photographies correspondaient esthétiquement à ce que Purple essayait de transmettre, dans ses pages, sur la photographie.
Mon expérience de critique a débuté par une interview que j’ai faîte de Richard Prince, publiée dans Art in America en mars 1987 — un artiste qui prenait des photos mais qui n’était pas un photographe professionnel. Un an plus tard, j’ai écrit une monographie qui accompagnait la première véritable rétrospective de son travail au Magasin, à Grenoble.
Prince est aujourd’hui associé à ce qu’on appelle la pictures generation. Ce nom vient d’une exposition intitulée Pictures qui s’est tenue en 1977 à l’Artists Space — une galerie non commerciale dans le Lower Manhattan —, organisée par sa directrice, Helene Weiner, et Douglas Crimp, un jeune historien et théoricien de l’art. Dans ses essais, Crimp parlait d’artistes qui avaient intégré des icônes des mass média dans leurs œuvres et dont l’univers était essentiellement dominé par ce genre d’images. Il y avait cinq artistes à l’exposition de l’Artists Space : Sherrie Levine, Robert Longo, Phillip Smith, Troy Brauntuch, et Jack Goldstein. Ni Richard Prince, ni Cindy Sherman, aujourd’hui considérés comme le roi et la reine de la pictures generation, ne faisaient partie de cette exposition. (Cela dit, ils n’étaient pas non plus connus dans la communauté artistique en 1977.) Mais ces deux artistes, parmi de nombreux autres, allaient hisser la photographie au rang de la peinture, car beaucoup d’entre eux faisaient des photos aussi grandes, aussi éclatantes de couleurs et aussi dramatiques que des tableaux.
Les artistes de la pictures generation étaient très au fait, bien sûr, de la grammaire moderne et formaliste de la peinture, du dessin et de la sculpture. Ils étaient aussi entièrement plongés dans le monde prolifique de la publicité et dans l’imagerie du star system, comme tout le monde l’est de nos jours, ce que beaucoup de critiques en sont venus à associer, un peu trop facilement je pense, à du spectacle. Les artistes de la pictures generation ont intégré des images photographiques en tout genre dans les créations de style traditionnel qu’ils réalisaient dans leurs grands lofts encore bon marché du Lower Manhattan. Ils puisaient leur inspiration chez des d’artistes comme Rauschenberg, Johns et Warhol, qui avaient abandonné l’arrière-fond d’angoisse qu’exprimaient les expressionnistes abstraits comme Pollock et Newmann, mais qui affectionnaient leurs peintures monumentales qui faisaient écho au Guernica de Picasso, et non pas les immenses panoramas du Cinémascope auxquels certains artistes de la pictures generation comparaient leurs photos.
Sherman s’est mise en scène en actrice de cinéma, dans ses pseudo photographies de plateau. Prince a « rephotographié », comme il disait, les publicités des magazines et des affiches, dont beaucoup étaient en noir et blanc, en rognant les textes d’accroches et une partie de l’image pour mettre en lumière des éléments choisis, par exemple des mains qui tiennent des cigarettes, des femmes qui regardent sur la gauche ou des cowboys. Prince utilisait de la pellicule diapositive Kodachrome (qui peut encore être achetée par correspondance) pour créer un style d’image qui avaient l’air à la fois ancienne et récente, comme ses rephotographies teintées de rose réalisées en diapositives à partir d’images en noir et blanc de poignets exhibant des montres.
Je suis un enfant du baby-boom comme Prince, l’une de ces millions de fourmis nées entre 1946 et 1964. Notre génération a grandi avec le modernisme et l’art « fait main ». Les images des magazines étaient une source d'inspiration courante pour les artistes de la pictures generation. Et puis, en 1992, le nouvel ordinateur convivial Macintosh, qui venait d'être mis sur le marché, a permis à des gens comme Elein Fleiss et Olivier Zahm, les fondateurs de Purple Prose, de relever le niveau des productions « fait maison » et de créer des revues artistiques à l'aide d'un Mac. Cette génération d'éditeurs de revues amateurs, qui avaient à peu près 10 ans de plus que Cédrick, avaient besoin de photographes pour remplir leurs pages. Purple (le nom a été simplifié en 1998) travaillait avec Wolfgang Tillmans, Terry Richardson, Anders Edström, et Mark Borthwick, pour n’en citer que quelques-uns. Ces photographes dépeignaient leur génération, qu’on a appelée la génération X, et son mode de vie que j’associe au style Purple. Leurs photographies n'étaient pas tellement travaillées, comme l’étaient celles de Sherman ou de Prince, ou les photographies grandes comme des toiles de photographes européens tels qu'Andreas Gursky, Thomas Ruff, et Thomas Struth. Les membres de la génération X appartenaient à un monde différent et affichaient une sensibilité différente. Ils écoutaient du rock indépendant comme Sonic Youth, Chan Marshall alias Cat Power, ou Will Oldham, qui jouait à ses débuts sous le nom de Palace Brothers; pas les Talking Heads ou The Cars. Ils réalisaient des installations et ne vivaient ni ne travaillaient forcément dans des lofts pour créer des objets pour les galeries. Ils puisaient leur inspiration dans le cinéma indépendant, surtout japonais ou taïwanais : pas dans Apocalypse Now ou Blade Runner. Des photographes comme Tillmans, Edström, et Borthwick véhiculaient un style dont l’esthétique et les images collaient à ces films indépendants. Ils faisaient des photos pour les magazines. Le style indépendant qui apparut dans Purple allait développer un style plus global de la photographie de mode (mais ceci est une autre histoire).
En 1992, Cédrick était un adolescent du Sud de la France. Six ans plus tard, c’était aux photographes qui travaillaient pour Purple Prose, comme Anders Edström et Mark Borthwick que je pensais en regardant les photos de Cédrick, en le voyant battre sa pile d’images comme un jeu de carte, avec la confiance insouciante et l’œil critique de l’artiste. J’ai voulu lui parler d’Anders, mais Cédrick m’a dit qu’il avait déjà vu ses photos dans Purple. (Sa connaissance de l’art contemporain et de la photographie était approfondie.)
Pour moi, Anders Edström, est un maître contemporain pour ce qui est de capter la lumière dans sa pureté rayonnante. Ses photographies de sujets éclairés naturellement illustrent une des différences frappantes entre les artistes de la pictures generation et les photographes de l’ère numérique. Les photos de Cédrick révélaient une perspective apparentée aux paisibles scènes d’Anders qui mettent fortement l’accent sur la lumière ambiante. Cédrick compose son image selon l’inclinaison de la lumière ambiante qui doit être coordonnée avec la sensibilité de la pellicule et l’ouverture du diaphragme. Cette composition était l’incarnation de la cohérence que je voyais dans ses photos.
Il est difficile de dire comment on apprend de telles choses, puisqu’elles sont le résultat d’une évolution personnelle. C’était en 1998. Cédrick utilisait un Nikon. La photographie numérique en était à ses balbutiements. Les ordinateurs étaient en train de changer le monde. Toujours est-il qu’un artiste a besoin d’un sujet.

+++

Eugène Atget (1854-1927) a choisi un seul et immense sujet, avec l’idée qu’un jour une collection encyclopédique d’images donnerait un aperçu du temps, du lieu et de l’histoire, ce qui fut le cas des siennes pour la ville de Paris. Des photographes comme Weegee (né Arthur Fellig, 1899-1968) et Henri Cartier-Bresson (1908-2004) capturaient des événements saisissants ; le premier prenait des photos de morts violentes et le second des scènes de vie. A leur époque, les photographies étaient en noir et blanc.
La photographie couleur s'est développée à partir du noir et blanc, poussée par le progrès technique et un discours critique sur la composition, de George Eastman (fondateur de Eastman Kodak), Walker Evans, William Eggleston, aux images retouchées par Photoshop comme les grands formats très détaillés de Gursky, qu’il réalise avec une chambre grand format et qui peuvent être vues à plusieurs mètres comme des images « gestalt » ou, de près, lues comme des textes. L’œil humain ne peut pas saisir toutes ces informations en même temps. Nos yeux ne sont pas comme une camera obscura, une chambre noire. Nous devons fixer notre regard pour voir les détails.
De nombreux photographes contemporains ont aussi fait des photos en noir et blanc de style classique. A la fin des années 60 et au début des années 70, Lewis Baltz a pris des photos de parcs industriels, qu’il développait dans sa cuisine en utilisant du papier à très forte teneur en argent. Dans les années 80, James Casebere a construit des maquettes architecturales en plaque de polystyrène qu’il a photographiées en couleurs mais éclairées d’une façon particulière pour que cela ressemble à une photo spectaculaire en noir et blanc de Ansel Adams. Robert Mapplethorpe a photographié des nus statuaires masculins qui rappelaient les sculptures en marbre classiques. Chacun de ces photographes rappelait une conception et une composition formalistes.
Les premières photographies de plateau de Cindy Sherman étaient aussi en noir et blanc, comme l’étaient beaucoup des « rephotographies » de Richard Prince. Mais leurs œuvres rappelaient les reproductions publicitaires, pas les photographies formalistes au format standard, prises d'après nature. Il y a bien sûr des photographes qui travaillent en couleurs et qui créent des images stoïquement classiques comme les nus de Paul Outerbridge souvent exposés sur du papier mat, ou les natures-mortes extrêmement élégantes de Irving Penn. Et à leur suite, dans un style proche de celui de Casebere — ou des mises en scène de Gregory Crewdson —, l’artiste contemporain Thomas Demand construit des maquettes d’intérieurs qu’il photographie pour en faire des images très graphiques. Toutes ces images relèvent d’un style de photographie « chef d’œuvre », qui cherche à atteindre la noblesse de la peinture.
Le temps que Cédrick soit impliqué dans ce qui fut par la suite appelé le Purple Institute, les magazines, les vidéos et toutes les photos imaginables étaient référencés par des moteurs de recherche comme Google. Des images de toute sorte étaient enregistrées dans des appareils électroniques portables. Contrairement à ma génération ou même à celle des fondateurs de Purple, la génération de Cédrick n’achète plus tant de magazines ni ne va au cinéma qu’elle ne télécharge des univers entiers d’informations. Manifestement, cette évolution de l’information de masse et peut-être son lien avec l’attitude indépendante du magazine Purple l’ont influencé. Mais il en fut de même pour la peinture d’histoire, même si cela a moins affecté le sujet ou la composition que les effets de couleur et de surface.

+++

Les peintures sont des représentations en images, faîtes à la main, hautement maîtrisées. Elles nécessitent un équilibre dans la composition. Je dis aux jeunes peintres de se méfier de toute diagonale dominante parce qu’elle tire l’œil hors du plan de l’image et brise son équilibre frontal. Je compare Piet Mondrian, qui centrait carrément ses images, et restait fidèle aux couleurs primaires et au noir, à son ami Theo van Doesburg qui introduisit la diagonale et la couleur verte, éloignant ainsi ses abstractions des carrés et des quadrillages de la culture pour les attirer vers le marécage grouillant de la nature. (Ici, je simplifie à l’extrême. La peintre allemande Tomma Abts, lauréate du prix Turner 2006, dément toutes mes théories. Cependant, j’admire sa façon d’utiliser les diagonales et de laisser apparentes de vieilles traces d'adhésif, ce qui est un indice de la fascinante imprévisibilité de l’art.) Néanmoins, les images requièrent les forces stabilisantes de l'équilibre, de l'ordre et de la proportion. Une image stable s’incarne dans ses limites. Ces choses font les artistes ou les détruisent. Certains artistes créent de façon instinctive des images incontestables. Étudiant de deuxième année, Cédrick en était capable, lui aussi.
Récemment, néanmoins, en parlant avec Cédrick, je me suis souvenu d'un article publié par E. H. Gombrich en 1964, intitulé Lumière, forme et texture dans la peinture du XVe siècle : il y distinguait comment la lumière tombant sur un corps « révèle sa forme » et comment « la façon dont la surface du corps réfléchit la lumière révèle sa texture ». Gombrich juxtaposait La Vierge au chanoine van der Paele de Jan Van Eyck, 1436, qu’il décrivait comme extrêmement détaillée et axée sur le brillant grâce à la lumière qui se reflète dans les détails comme dans autant de miroirs, avec La Vierge et l’Enfant avec les Saints, de Domenico Veneziano, peint à Florence vers 1441, qui utilise une palette plus aride et qui est une étude plus formelle du rendu en trois dimensions des volumes, des formes et des contours au sein d’une perspective rigoureuse. Les artistes d’Europe du Nord comme Van Eyck créaient des surfaces de réflexion de la lumière dans lesquelles la texture et l’éclat soulignent des détails comme « le brillant des cheveux de la Madone ». La peinture du Sud des Alpes était plus sculpturale et se conformait à la conception de Leone Battista Alberti lorsqu’il insistait sur la construction minutieuse d’une forme stable en perspective de préférence au rendu minutieux des reflets telle qu’il l’énonçait dans son Traité de la Peinture publié en 1435. Ainsi, Alberti insistait sur le fait que les artistes ne devaient pas utiliser d’or, comme avaient coutume de le faire les primitifs italiens, parce qu’utiliser le reflet éblouissant de l’or amoindrissait l’effet et empêchait les formes de s’incarner.
La comparaison de l’historien d’art Gombrich est une généralité irréfutable. Van Eyck et Veneziano construisaient des images basées sur leurs propres normes des sujets religieux et de la représentation picturale. Au Nord des Alpes, les artistes ont développé une norme du reflet. Au Sud des Alpes, dans la lignée d’Alberti — exemple du nouvel humanisme — les artistes créaient des images selon les règles de la perspective linéaire. À la longue, un groupe apprenait de l’autre à l’occasion de voyages et d'échanges.
Les artistes pratiquent toujours leur art en corrélation avec les conventions du moment. Ils cherchent aussi des manières de personnaliser ces conventions. La perspective linéaire est le point focal du développement de l’art occidental. Aujourd’hui, néanmoins, nous avons dépassé cette spécificité. Le cinéma et la télévision ont même amené un renversement, les spectateurs devenant les points focaux des images lumineuses. Mais si on appliquait à la photographie la thèse de Gombrich sur la forme en opposition au reflet, alors les photos en noir et blanc pourraient être considérées comme formelles : un sujet est rendu visible par les différents niveaux de gris entre le noir et le blanc absolus, ce qui tend à révéler la forme. Un exemple extrême en est le photographe constructiviste russe Alexandre Rodchenko. Mais les photographies en noir et blanc de Baltz, Casabere et Mapplethorpe sont également graphiquement silencieuses, statiques comme des pierres, sans la moindre suggestion de mouvement, ce qui est l’un des travers de l’éclat et de la brillance. La lumière ne reste pas immobile ; et les photographies en couleurs, surtout celles qui retiennent les reflets de lumière, sont soumises aux aléas du mouvement et au changement de la lumière, mais pas à ceux de la forme.
Les photographies en couleurs de Cédrick sont des surfaces de lumière, d'éclat et de forme et non de simples jeux de contrastes sur les contours et les formes. Ses photos sont comme des apparitions qui adviennent de sa contemplation du monde lumineux. Le sujet nait de sa rencontre fortuite avec la lumière. Les apparitions disparaissent au moindre changement de perspective. On pourrait penser que les photos de Cédrick sont génériquement plus proches de l’éclat et du reflet d’une peinture de Van Eyck. Et pourtant, son formalisme l’apparente davantage à Rodchenko, mais sans la géométrie sculpturale et dogmatique du constructiviste russe. Cédrick n’en rajoute pas avec son style ou sa composition comme peut le faire Rodchenko. Ses photos sont plus éclatantes que sculpturales. Il recherche des relations inhabituelles entre les objets, les couleurs, les surfaces et les reflets, qu’il concentre en une image d’ensemble stable, disons à la manière d’un peintre qui assemblerait des couleurs contrastées en une structure visuelle mais en retenant la lumière qui se reflète sur la carrosserie d’une voiture.
Cela soulève une question importante de l’art moderne : l’observation. J’entends par là observer le monde avec un œil critique (ce qui, dans notre société, devient l’analyse sociale d’un psychologue évolutionniste). Cédrick remarquera quand, dans une rue, deux objets très différents seront de la même couleur. Il les alignera dans le viseur de son appareil photo pour mettre en lumière la parenté de ces objets sans aucun lien, fixant dans son objectif la lumière qu’ils réfléchissent pareillement. Cette perspective est quelque chose comme le dessin accidentel que l’on découvre en faisant tourner le tube d’un kaléidoscope, à la recherche de motifs qui s’alignent de façon cohérente. Sauf que le point de mire de son observation naît de sa recherche de structures de lumière et de couleurs. C’est ce que je voulais signifier en disant que ses photographies se rapprochaient de la peinture par l’agencement de la couleur et des reflets.

+++

Les photographies que j’ai vues à Nîmes, vers 1998, étaient des plans moyens, pris dans les zones interstitielles denses que l’on trouve entre les centres urbains et les banlieues, entre les monuments de la haute civilisation des centres-villes, que sont les cathédrales, les musées et les gratte-ciel, et la campagne vers laquelle la civilisation s’étend pour l’engloutir. Dans ces zones, il traque la lumière, véritable médium de la photographie.
Les travaux cumulés par Cédrick au fil des années ont évolué vers des directions différentes mais liées, de sorte qu’une nature-morte de cristal de roche va faire écho dans sa solidité à la lumière reflétée par les carrosseries ou les fleurs vues le long d’une rue dans d’autres images. Capter une image forte nécessite de la précision technique. C’est quelque chose que l’on doit faire sortir de soi, par la pratique. D’après mon expérience, au cours de la deuxième année de Beaux-Arts, ce genre de chose devrait se manifester et commencer à évoluer. Il en résulte que dès cette première rencontre, je ne me suis plus adressé à Cédrick en tant que professeur, mais comme un compagnon de voyage. Dès lors, son travail n’a cessé de progresser. Par ses voyages, il a multiplié les découvertes de différents degrés et nuances de lumière : la matière enluminée. Son œil s’est aiguisé pour rendre visible les relations, variée mais prévisibles, que la lumière entretient avec les objets. Cela se traduit souvent par des taches ou des touches de couleur provenant de vitrines, de pare-brise, de verres, de panneaux publicitaires, de fleurs, etc. Les couleurs émergent d’un arrière-plan pour aller vers la lumière, comme par héliotropisme, et sont retenues dans le viseur d’un appareil-photo. En brouillant la vision, on pourrait leur donner l’aura abstraite d’une peinture, disons, d’Odilon Redon, dont les tableaux à l’atmosphère morose font contraster des touches de pastel claires qui se détachent d’autres plus sombres. Mais il n’est pas nécessaire ici de brouiller la vision pour accéder à une profonde énigme psychologique. Les photographies disent ce qu’elles ont à dire avec la plus grande clarté.

+++

Gombrich a écrit sur la façon dont les jeux de reflets et le rendu formel des volumes étaient à l’œuvre dans la peinture de la Renaissance. Des siècles plus tard, quand les photographes commencèrent à utiliser les pellicules couleurs, beaucoup pensèrent que ces images étaient vulgaires. Seules les photos en noir et blanc, et plus particulièrement les tirages argentiques, avaient la majesté d’une image classique. La couleur rendait la surface éblouissante, rappelant le chatoiement des mosaïques et non l’intemporalité de la pierre — un peu comme le grief d’Alberti à l’égard des peintres qui utilisaient la feuille d’or. Cédrick utilise la lumière pour souligner et mettre en valeur l’espace intermédiaire entre la culture civilisée et la nature sauvage — les lieux où nous nous épanouissons.
Nous sommes tous saisis par les contrastes de lumière au coucher et au lever du soleil, par les feux de camp, les projecteurs, les villes éclairées la nuit. De telles visions mettent en lumière de façon sensuelle, et souvent sensationnelle, le passage entre l’obscurité et la lumière. Cédrick rend la lumière plus perceptible.
Deux choses que je n’ai pas mentionnées : Cédrick réalise des films et fait de la musique. Ses films ajoutent du mouvement à sa vision photographique, ce qui n’est pas simple, quand on considère que ses photographies exigent qu’il trouve des moments particuliers de lumière. Ajouter la durée à la composition photographique demande un bon réglage, la bonne lumière, et les qualités d’organisation d’un chef opérateur de cinéma. Il a réalisé des films à Chicago, Tokyo, Rotterdam, Miami, à l’aéroport Roissy-Charles de Gaulle et à La Défense, à la limite de Paris, et des films sur la pluie et la conduite, pour ne citer que deux thèmes. Les films montrent la même curiosité sélective que ses photographies. Ses films sont aussi accompagnés de musique créée soit par des compositeurs comme Stephan Mathieu, Fennez ou le couple américain Damon & Naomi, ou par lui-même ou son groupe, Cats Hats Gowns. Sa musique instrumentale basée sur des sons de guitares et de synthétiseur Moog, cherche une sensibilité proche de celle de ses photographies : combiner une atmosphère en arrière-plan et une révélation au premier plan ; improviser des mélodies sur des rythmes sous-jacents. Sa musique est née de ce que j’écoutais quand je travaillais au Purple Institute, et c’est quelque chose que nous avons en commun. Un des guitaristes préférés de Cédrick est Loren Connors, spécialiste des sons simples mais élégants. Et la sensibilité de Cédrick, comme la mienne, est allergique à la vulgarité nue de nombreux genres qui prolifèrent dans la musique et l’art populaires, que ce soient les bandes originales de films vrombissantes et horripilantes, ou le narcissisme caractérisé des ambitieux hystériques.
Pendant environ quatre mille ans, l’art était fait pour les temples et les palais, qu’on a appelés ensuite musées et galeries : des lieux que les gens se forcent de visiter, pour y faire soit leurs dévotions, soit leur édification culturelle. Aujourd’hui, les gens regardent les films à la maison et téléchargent leur musique sur des appareils portables. Cette évolution arrache les spectateurs à l’architecture d’un monde ancien et les projette dans l’univers sans pesanteur de l’ère spatiale et de l’ordinateur : un médium qui non seulement transcende l’espace mais canalise aussi l’information. Nous sommes également en plein cœur d’une renaissance des livres de photos, qui sont les descendants, à usage personnel, des temples et des palais. Les images de ce livre sont les révélations iconiques de ses errances.